Cleaning pools after floods and fires

CycloneThumb

Image: CareFlight Qld

Stephen Humphris offers advice on cleaning pools after floods and fires.

Cleaning a pool in flood affected areas

To clear a muddy pool, Humphris recommends using one litre of floc for the average 50,000 litre pool (for this example he is talking about his product Quick Floc). For best results, ensure the pool has a pH of 7.8 or higher (add pH Increaser or pH Buffer if the pH is below this).

If the pool has a media filter installed, select bypass on the multi-port valve and run the pump for three to four hours. If the pool has a cartridge filter, remove the cartridge and run the pump for three to four hours to mix the floc through the entire pool.

Once mixed, turn the pool pump off for six hours or until the particles have settled to the bottom. Once settled, move the valve to the waste position and manually vacuum the pool water to waste. If not all the mud is removed in the first vacuum, you may need to allow the particles to settle again for a further six hours and re-vacuum. If the level of mud in the pool is extreme, the use of Granular Pool Floc may be required instead of the Quick Floc.

If the pool has been flood affected, caution needs to be taken when draining pools at this time as the flood water has made ground conditions around the foundations of the pool very wet. Pools should not be drained until ground conditions have dried to at least the depth of the pool as the entire shell of the pool (fibreglass or concrete) can pop out of its original position with the change in hydrostatic pressures.

Until such time that the pool can be drained, Humphris is advising pool technicians to dose the pools contaminated with flood waters with a large amount of chlorine and wait until they are happy that the ground has dried up sufficiently to avoid these complications. Some pools are requiring in excess of 40kg of calcium hypochlorite before a chlorine reading has been obtained.

If a pool owner insists on having the pool drained, cleaned and balanced straight away, Humphris recommends having the owner sign a disclaimer to make them aware of the potential risks. All electrical pool equipment should be checked by a licensed electrician or replaced before the pool is re-commissioned.

Cleaning a pool in bushfire affected areas

If the level of ash build-up is only minor, Humphris recommends using a strong clarifier like Ultrasheen Concentrate to filter the particles out of the pool using the filtration system.

If the build-up is substantial, he recommends the use of Quick Floc to drop the particles to the bottom of the pool where they can be easily vacuumed to waste.

The use of one litre of Quick Floc is sufficient for the average 50,000 litre backyard swimming pool. For best results, ensure the pool has a pH of 7.8 or higher (add pH Increaser or pH Buffer if the pH is below this).

If the pool has a media filter installed, select bypass on the multi-port valve and run the pump for three to four hours. If the pool has a cartridge filter, remove the cartridge and run the pump for three to four hours to mix the Quick Floc through the entire pool. Once mixed, turn the pool pump off for six hours or until the particles have settled to the bottom. Once settled, move the valve to the waste position and manually vacuum the pool water to waste. If not all the debris is removed in the first vacuum, you may need to allow the particles to settle again for a further six hours and re-vacuum.

If the level of debris in the pool is extreme, the use of Granular Pool Floc may be required instead of the Quick Floc.

 

 

Comments are closed.
The new & improved SPLASH! Trade Directory is now live!