Residential Pools and Spas

Sydney moves to Level 2 water restrictions

December 18, 2019

In Sydney, the Blue Mountains and the Illawarra, Level 2 restrictions are now in place. This means you can top up an existing pool or spa using a hose fitted with a trigger nozzle, watering can or bucket for a maximum of 15 minutes a day. You can only do this to replace water lost through evaporation, not to replace water deliberately removed from the pool or spa.

You can’t fill a new or renovated pool or spa (that holds more than 500 L) with drinking water unless you have a pool/spa filling permit and an approved pool cover or lockable spa cover in use. You can’t leave hoses and taps running unattended, use water toys that connect to a hose, such as a slip‘n’slide or allow children to play under sprinklers.

Currently, a Climate Care Certified pool cover is required by Sydney Water and Hunter Water for pools and spas to be filled with more than 10,000 litres of water.

The Hunter region will also move into Level 2 restrictions from January 20, 2020, unless conditions improve. See this link for more. 

Sydney Water has established an online service to help you work out where your water comes. Simply go to the website and search by postcode. 

Water restrictions are in place in many areas across the country. In some regional areas restrictions are particularly severe during this deteriorating water situation. For the latest information on water restrictions in your location contact SPASA Australia.

Image: In Sydney, the Illawarra and the Blue Mountains, you can now only top up an existing pool or spa using a hose fitted with a trigger nozzle, watering can or bucket for a maximum of 15 minutes a day.

Advocating for the future of water

Industry leaders banded together to advocate at the Sydney Water and Hunter Water Forum

Meanwhile, the Sydney Water and Hunter Water Forum was held recently in Sydney to discuss the future of this resource that is so valuable for all Australians – and especially for the swimming pool and spa industry.

A delegation of pool and spa industry leaders was invited by SPASA Australia to attend the forum.

The forum’s primary aim was to work towards delivering achievable and sustainable solutions through a best practice model in preparation of more stringent future water restrictions.

“The swimming pool and spa industry must move beyond reactive advocacy,” says SPASA Australia CEO, Lindsay McGrath. “SPASA takes a leading, proactive role to promote our professional members to secure and safeguard our ongoing access water during drought periods

“SPASA Australia’s advocacy efforts send a message to Sydney Water and Hunter Water that the swimming pool and spa industry is united, engaged and has solutions.”

Both Sydney Water and Hunter Water have recognised SPASA Australia’s Climate Care Certified Program and advanced discussions are in play with other water regulators in including SEQwater.

The program was developed to future proof the industry against drought and energy crises, highlighting products, installations and services that have a sustainable, environmentally focused and innovative approach to delivering a happier and healthier swimming community.

 



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